1940s-50s  • Twenty years after the first, so-called "Golden Age of Illustration" there was a second, smaller golden age that began with the end of WWII. An explosion of new brands, products and labor-saving devices tneeded to be introduced to potential consumers. Advertising had not yet moved to TV, and photography was not yet in wide use. Illustrations were everywhere and illustrators were in demand. Where pre-war color reproduction was rare and drawings were mostly simple black and white, post-war illustrations were full-color paintings that told  tales of abundance, optimism and romance. "Big magazines" appeared in every home. Their story illustrations suggested comfort, if not wealth, and featured beautiful women in relaxed poses.

 

Illustration • Magazine

1950-model_1410.jpg
1950-model_1410.jpg

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lady-jewels-cat_0292.jpg
lady-jewels-cat_0292.jpg

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pj-party_0289.jpg
pj-party_0289.jpg

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girl-chair_0298.jpg
girl-chair_0298.jpg

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phonecallgirl.jpg
phonecallgirl.jpg
lady-in-mirror_0291.jpg
lady-in-mirror_0291.jpg

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© 2015 by Rebecca Kalin

Vic's magazine illustrations were mostly gouache on board, painted from both imagination and posed photographs. Among his "Big Magazine" accounts were:
Esquire, Collier’s, American Weekly and Liberty.